+ ALL CITY OF PARIS MUSEUMS

Discover all 14 City of Paris museums

» Fermer
Georges Clairin - Portrait of Sarah Bernhardt
Armand Point - Peacock Casket
Camille Alaphilippe - Woman with Monkey
Aristide  Maillol - Seated female nude with her left hand on her head. Study for The Mediterranean
Louis-Robert Carrier-Belleuse - The Struggle for Life vase
Léon  Lhermitte - Les Halles
Fernand Pelez - The Death of Emperor Commodus
Pierre-Auguste Renoir - Ambroise Vollard in a Red Scarf
Jean Carriès - My Portrait
Emile Gallé - Two-handled vase
Georges-Henri Lemaire - Silence or Immortality
Charles-Alexandre Giron - Woman wearing gloves, also known as The Parisienne
Paul Sérusier - Tricoteuse au bas rose
Pierre-Auguste  Renoir - Portrait of Madame de Bonnières
Berthe Morisot - Jeune fille en décolleté - La fleur aux cheveux
Pierre Bonnard - Conversation à Arcachon
Pierre-Adrien Dalpayrat - Dish : The judgment of Paris
Joseph-Marius Avy  - Bal blanc
Marie Constantine Bashkirtseff - Parisienne, Portrait of Irma
Maurice Denis - Female bathers at Perros-Guirec
Fernand Pelez - La Vachalcade
Alfred Sisley - The Church at Moret (Evening)
Théophile Alexandre Steinlen - Ball on the 14th of July
Edmond  Aman-Jean - Miss Ella Carmichaël

Two-handled vase

Emile
Gallé
Nancy, 1846 – Nancy, 1904
1896
Crystal blown in several layers, inclusions, cabochons and applied handles
35 x 16 cm

This two-handled vase with lily and daisy decorations was a private commission.

In March 1896, Comtesse Henri Greffulhe, née Elisabeth de Caraman-Chimay, asked Gallé to design a vase as a gift for Princess Marguerite de Chartres who was marrying the Duc de Magenta. The cousin of the countess, the poet Robert de Montesquiou, composed a special quatrain to be etched onto the side of the vase.

The item shown here is Study IV for the final vase and was exhibited in 1897 at the Salon de la Société des Beaux-Arts. Several copies of some of Gallé’s one-off pieces were produced  to reduce the risks and losses which could take place during the production process.
The relatively simple shape of the vase, inspired by ancient Greek ceramics, contrasts with the rich lily and daisy decoration which provide a visual echo of the Princess of Chartres’ first name. The gold dust inclusions and cabochons in relief emphasize the precious and refined nature of the work, belying the fact that it looks like an imperfect trial piece.

Inventory number: 
OGAL00553
Inventory number : OGAL00553
Acquisition details : Purchase, 1932
This work is not currently on display
Section : Paris 1900
Roll your mouse over the exhibit to view detail.
Previous
48 / 53
Next