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Georges Clairin - Portrait of Sarah Bernhardt
Armand Point - Peacock Casket
Camille Alaphilippe - Woman with Monkey
Aristide  Maillol - Seated female nude with her left hand on her head. Study for The Mediterranean
Louis-Robert Carrier-Belleuse - The Struggle for Life vase
Léon  Lhermitte - Les Halles
Pierre-Auguste Renoir - Ambroise Vollard in a Red Scarf
Jean Carriès - My Portrait
Emile Gallé - Two-handled vase
Georges-Henri Lemaire - Silence or Immortality
Charles-Alexandre Giron - Woman wearing gloves, also known as The Parisienne
Paul Sérusier - Tricoteuse au bas rose
Pierre-Auguste  Renoir - Portrait of Madame de Bonnières
Berthe Morisot - Jeune fille en décolleté - La fleur aux cheveux
Pierre Bonnard - Conversation à Arcachon
Pierre-Adrien Dalpayrat - Dish : The judgment of Paris
Joseph-Marius Avy  - Bal blanc
Marie Constantine Bashkirtseff - Parisienne, Portrait of Irma
Maurice Denis - Female bathers at Perros-Guirec
Fernand Pelez - La Vachalcade
Camille  Pissarro - Le Pont Royal et le Pavillon de Flore
Alfred Sisley - The Church at Moret (Evening)
Théophile Alexandre Steinlen - Ball on the 14th of July

Pair of vases

Pierre-Adrien
Dalpayrat
(Limoges, 1844 – Paris, 1910)
Design presented at the Universal Exhibition of 1900
Vases in the shape of amphorae in glazed stoneware
200 x 70 cm

Pierre-Adrien Dalpayrat learned to paint on porcelain in Limoges, Bordeaux and Toulouse. He opened his own ceramic factory in Bourg-la-Reine in approximately 1889.

In 1892, he teamed up with the sculptor Voisin-Delacroix to produce “stoneware and all other varieties of ceramic”. Voisin-Delacroix was responsible for modelling the shapes and Dalpayrat for the actual manufacture (firing, glazing, patinas). This artistic partnership came to an end in 1893 with the death of Voisin-Delacroix.

Dalpayrat is famous for stoneware in warm, sumptuous hues and a bull’s blood red cover coat with jasper blue or green highlights. He designed vases in the shape of fruits such as marrows and colocynths, whose surface he sometimes brought to life with fantastical animals or human and organic shapes. He worked with goldsmiths including Cardeilhac to create one-off pieces mounted on metal and produced porcelain or earthenware tableware.

At the Universal Exhibition in 1900, he exhibited two vases which were almost two metres tall, demonstrating considerable technical and artistic skill.

Inventory number: 
PPO03672 (1) ; PPO03672 (2)
Inventory number : PPO03672 (1) ; PPO03672 (2)
Room 1. The decorative arts in 1900
Section : Paris 1900
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