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Dirck Van Delen - A scene of gallantry in a palace
David Teniers the Younger - Smokers
Jan Steen - The Little Alms Collector
 Claude Gellée, known as Claude Lorrain - Landscape with the Port of Santa Marinella
Petrus Paulus Rubens - The Abduction of Proserpina
Adriaen Van Ostade - The Analysis
Jacob Jordaens - Diana Resting
 Rembrandt - Self-portrait in Oriental Attire
Meindert Hobbema - The Water Mills
Nicolas de Largillierre - Red-legged partridge in a niche
Henri Mauperché - Composite Landscape
Frans Van Mieris, known as Mieris the Elder - The interrupted song
Nicolas Poussin - The Massacre of the Innocents
Abraham de Vries - Portrait of a man

Landscape with the Port of Santa Marinella

Claude Gellée, known as Claude Lorrain
Chamagne, 1600 - Rome, 1682
Circa 1637/1638
Oil on copper
28 x 36 cm

This painting belongs to a pair Gellée was commissioned to make by Urban VIII.

One depicts a View of Castel Gandolfo, a palace on the banks of Lake Albano (Cambridge, Fitzwilliam Museum). Its counterpart, which entered the Petit Palais with the Dutuit collection, shows the little harbour of Santa Marinella near Civitavecchia, on the Roman coast, which this Pope decided to turn into a big port. He would not get past laying the initial foundations.

Although Claude went to Santa Marinella to produce his drawings, this is no topographical view, but a representation of a site in a fantasy setting, and curiously enough, the landscape, which is the point of the painting, is much reduced. He reconstructs nature following the methods of classical landscape painting, of which he was the ambassador par excellence. The real subject here is light. The intense orange radiance of the sky illuminates the depths of the landscape, is reflected in the water and unifies the space.

The physical beauty of the picture’s surface, the density of the brushstrokes down to the last detail, and the richness of the pigments help to express nature in its concrete and symbolic truth.

Inventory number: 
PDUT00872
Inventory number : PDUT00872
Acquisition details : Dutuit bequest, 1902
The 17th century
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